Keynote speaker from IT industry will astound

stevenlevyIAWP Washington is fortunate to have contracted with an excellent keynote speaker who will help us create opportunities for success during the State Conference.

Steven B. Levy is a business leader, public speaker, project manager, author, and the CEO of
Lexician, which provides training, coaching, and consulting on leadership, presentation, and time and project management.

His presentation for the keynote will be “The Sane Workplace: Manage Time, Reduce Stress.” Steven will also do a breakout workshop on “The Three Laws of Leadership.”

Previously, as a senior leader at Microsoft for 17 years, Levy headed the legal technology / operations department, led two product groups, co-headed application development in IT, and managed multi-million-dollar consulting projects. He specialized in innovation, leadership, customer and client focus, and team effectiveness.

His books include the new and ground­breaking PowerPoint Slides That Work! Show + Tell for Grownups, plus the book that defined project management for the legal profession, Legal Project Management: Control Costs, Meet Schedules, Manage Risks, and Maintain Sanity, the thought-provoking The Off Switch: Discovering Your Work-Work Balance, and the introduction to the LPM field, Legal Project Management Field Guide: Five Tools for Busy Professionals. Look for his new Ten Minutes to Better Business Meetings, coming summer 2016. Learn more at http://WorkWorkBalance.com.

His unique and practical approach to leadership, people and project management, and workplace effectiveness is based on 35 years of managing projects and leading businesses on three continents. His work has made him a highly requested speaker, trainer and seminar leader.

Come to state conference in May to learn from Steven B. Levy.

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Top 10 best Job Search Sites/Engines for 2015

by Alison Doyle, About.com

Careerbuilder.com: Among the leading job boards, providing job listings, resume posting, and career advice and resources to job seekers. CareerBuilder has partnered with many newspapers to provide local as well as national job listings.

Dice.com: The leading site for tech job seekers. You can search by company, job title, keyword and location. There’s also career advice and tech news for job seekers.

Glassdoor.com:  A career community that helps people find jobs and companies recruit top talent. Glassdoor members can find Inside Connections at a company through their Facebook network, see the latest job listings, as well as get access to proprietary user-generated content including company-specific salary reports, ratings and reviews, CEO approval ratings, interview questions and reviews, office photos, and more.  2013 About.com Job Search Readers’ Choice Award Winner

Indeed.com: A leading job site with millions of job listings from thousands of websites, including company career pages, job boards, newspaper classifieds, associations and other online sources of job posting.

LinkedIn.com:  Connects the world’s professionals to make them more productive and successful. LinkedIn is the world’s largest professional network on the Internet. You can search jobs, view jobs you might be interested in, and follow companies of interest on LinkedIn.

LinkUp.com: If you want to avoid spam and scams and duplicate job listings, LinkUp is the job site for you. LinkUp monitors thousands of company career sections in order to connect applicants with often unadvertised jobs by listing the jobs on company websites. Because the jobs come direct from company sites you can be sure they are current openings.

Monster.com:  One of the original job boards and has expanded to include a variety of other resources and apps for job seekers. Monster users can search for an apply for jobs online, post a resume, review company profiles, and get salary information and career advice. 2013 About.com Job Search Readers’ Choice Award Winner

US.jobs:  The National Labor Exchange, derived from a partnership between the Direct Employers Association and the National Association of State Workforce Agencies (NASWA) designed to improve the labor market and directly connect employers and job seekers. Job seekers using US.jobs for their employment search have access to a database of a million+ unduplicated, verified positions from nationwide employers.

SimplyHired.com: Operates one of the world’s largest job search engines, and connects job seekers and employers through its powerful search engine platform and performance-based job advertising solution. The site provides access to millions of job openings across all job categories and industries, reaching job seekers on the web, social networks, mobile devices, email and through its exclusive network of thousands of partner sites.

idealist.org:  Idealist is the premier clearinghouse for information on full-time, internship and volunteer positions within the non-profit sector.  You can identify target organizations by their mission and specific types of opportunities within various niches. Registered users can search for contacts in fields or organizations of interest and message them for networking purposes.

About.com’s job search site is led by Alison Doyle, the job search expert for About.com since 1998. Alison is a job search and employment expert with many years of experience in human resources, career development, and job searching, with a focus on online job searching, social media, professional networking and employment issues, trends and technologies.

 

New News from USDOL

By Carl Fillichio, Senior adviser, U.S. Department of Labor

The US Department of Labor’s (USDOL) newsletter — No. 300 — features a new, fresh look. While the design has been simplified and streamlined, their commitment to you remains unchanged.

In the summer of 2009, the USDOL launched a weekly newsletter with five stories and an events calendar. Since that first issue, the newsletter has grown to nearly a half million subscribers.

Just as important, since then they also expanded their online audience through a blog as well as popular digital platforms like Twitter, Facebook, You Tube, Instagram and Google+, among others.

In short, they changed with the times and with technology, and now, they’ve changed again. They hope the redesign draws readers closer to their website and the array of original content and useful information that they post on our digital channels almost every day. And it will be easier to read on smartphones and tablets.

That first newsletter announced a grant competition to prepare workers for careers in health care; this newest newsletter announces a grant for research into how better develop and implement paid leave programs for working families.

Each week you’ll find something new, notable — and maybe even fun. USDOL is eager to share information with you on apprenticeship, the right to sound advice when saving for retirement, the facts on increasing the minimum wage, how federally funded programs in your community are ready to help train people with the skills that companies are seeking as they fill jobs, and much more.

They hope you’ll continue to stay up-to-date, tell them what you think, and offer suggestions to improve coverage.

If you’re not already subscribed to the newsletter, sign up today!

Carl Fillichio is the senior adviser for communications and public affairs at the U.S. Department of Labor.

#Go Volunteer

By Wendy Spencer, CEO, Corporation for National and Community Service

I love statistics that tell a compelling story. The numbers consistently show that Americans of all ages are working together to keep our nation strong.

This isn’t random — we know volunteering is and always will be a core American value. Last year, one in four of us volunteered through an organization, and two in three of us regularly helped our neighbors.

These highlights come from this year’s Volunteering and Civic Life in America, which I’m pleased to join the National Conference on Citizenship in sharing with you today:

  • Nearly 63 million Americans volunteered nearly 8 billion hours last year
  • This service has an estimated value of $173 billion (based on the Independent Sector’s estimate of the average value of a volunteer hour)
  • More than 138 million Americans (or 63 percent) volunteered informally in their communities

This report includes comprehensive data and trends which tell us just how deep the spirit of service runs in this country.

But that’s not the end of it: We need volunteers now more than ever. More than 80 percent of our nation’s nonprofits depend on volunteers to do their important work.

That’s why I’m asking all of you to give some of your time and #GoVolunteer. The holidays are an excellent time to get involved. Go as a family, take your kids, bring a friend. Visit Serve.gov for ideas on how to volunteer.

You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram for all the latest.

The state of volunteering and civic life in America is strong – and it’s up to you to keep it up.

P.S. A perfect time to volunteer is the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service on Jan. 19, 2015. Visit MLKDay.gov to find a service project near you!

Editor’s note: Overall, in Washington in 2014:

  • 32.9% of residents volunteer, ranking them 11th among the 50 states and Washington, DC.
  • 1.61 million volunteers
  • 28.2 volunteer hours per capita
  • 155.3 million hours of service
  • $3.6 billion of service contributed
  • 58.2% of residents donate $25 or more to charity

A guide to guides

Disability.gov links to more than 10,000 national, state and local resources. That’s a lot of information, which is why they developed a series of guides on the topics that are most important to you.

Whether you’re looking for information about disability benefits, housing assistance, job training programs or financial help for families with low incomes, Disability.gov’s 14 Guides to Information & Resources are a good place to start.

Disability.gov’s Guides to Information & Resources have been developed to help people with disabilities, their families and caregivers locate the resources they need in their community and nationwide. Whether you’re looking for information about Social Security benefits, finding a job, or financial assistance for students with disabilities, there’s a guide with answers to your questions.

Each guide begins with a series of “quick links” that answer many frequently asked questions. The Guides also connect you to information about organizations near you that offer programs and services that promote the inclusion and full participation of people with disabilities in their communities.

The following Guides are now available:
• Assistive and Accessible Technologies Guide
• Disability Benefits Guide
• Disability Rights Laws Guide
• Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Recovery Guide
• Employment Guide
• Family Caregivers Guide
• Federal Government Grants Guide
• Financial Help for Low-Income Individuals and Families Guide
• Health Information and Resources Guide
• Housing Guide
• Self-Employment and Starting a Small Business Guide
• Student Financial Aid Guide
• Student Transition Planning Guide
• Transportation Guide